Friedrich Wilhelm Bernhardt 1845–1892

GAR grave marker

Civil War Veteran                                                         PA. 6th Calvary ‘Rush’s Lancers’

Friedrich Wilhelm Bernhardt                                    2nd Great Grandfather                                           Born 1845 • Württemberg, Hamburg, Germany         Died 1892  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania                     He was a Boot/ Shoemaker                   


The Sixth Pennsylvania Calvary “Rush’s Lancers”

Rush's Lancers

The men of the Sixth Pennsylvania were the cream of Philadelphia society. Most of the officers came from the leading families of the City of Brotherly Love. Many of them served in the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, a militia unit that was originally formed to serve as George Washington’s personal body guard during the Revolutionary War. These bright, talented young men left their mark on many battlefield of the Civil War, earning them the proud title of…           “the Seventh Regulars.”

Frederick Bernhardt, Pvt. – 70th Regiment Sixth Pa. Vol. Cavalry             Company F -recruited in Philadelphia.

A Pvt. Civil War Union Soldier for 1 year term                                               Mustered in 10 Mar 1865, with Company F of the 6th Penna. Volunteers Cavalry, known as “Rush’s Lancers”. Was transferred to Company D, 2nd Provisional Cavalry, June 17, 1865. He mustered out Lebanon, Kentucky, August 7, 1865.

The Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry                                                                        participated in these engagements during his career

  • 28 March-9 April 1865 – Appomattox Campaign, VA
  • 30 March 1865 – Skirmishes on the line of Hatcher’s and Gravelly Runs, VA
  • 30-31 March 1865 – Engagement, Dinwiddie Court House, VA
  • 1 April 1865 – Battle, Five Forks, VA
  • 2 April 1865 – Action, Scott’s Cross Roads, VA
  • 4 April 1865 – Skirmish, Tabernacle Church (Beaver Dam Creek), VA
  • 6 April 1865 – Engagement, Sailor’s Creek, VA
  • 8 April 1865 – Engagement, Appomattox Station, VA
  • 9 April 1865 – Engagement, Clover Hill, Appomattox Court House, VA
  • 9 April 1865 – The Surrender, Appomattox Court House, VA

The Battle of Appomattox Court House, fought on the morning of April 9, 1865, was one of the last battles of the Civil War. The final engagement of General Robert E. Lee and his Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. That afternoon under Robert E. Lee the Confederate Army surrendered to the Union Army under Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant.

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parents, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Jacob Clair Rapp… 1836 – 1932

Civil War Veteran

Jacob Clair RAPP 1836-1932,   2nd great grandfather

Note: In 1932, within a 10 week period, Three of my Rapp ‘Grandfathers’ died

  • Sunday 28 Aug 1932, Edward 27, my Grandfather, Jacob’s grandson, died.
  • Saturday 22 Oct 1932, Jacob 96, my 2nd Great Grandfather died.
  • Friday 4 Nov 1932, Harry 67, my Great Grandfather, Jacob’s son, died.

GAR grave marker

The Daily Republican, Phoenixville, Pa.

Obituary on 22 October 1932

TAPS SOUNDED TODAY FOR 96-YEAR-OLD VET

Well-Known Phoenixville Indian and Civil War Soldier, Passed Away

Death marched early today with the Grand Army of the Republic and snatched another member of “the Boys in Blue”.

Jacob Rapp, 96-year-old veteran of the conflict between the North and the South and a survivor of several conflicts between the Indians and frontiersmen in pioneer days, was called at one o’clock this morning. He was conscious up to the very end, and showed the same bravery he often exhibited on the field of battle.

Although Mr. Rapp suffered a great physical handicap because of defective hearing for the past several years, he was apparently in good health until about three weeks ago. His death was the result of heart trouble and a kidney condition. His son, H. C. Rapp, the only survivor of the prominent Chester County family, said today that during the past week his father was well aware of his serious condition and expressed the desire that “he might die before winter set in.” “Father always dreaded cold weather and that is why I think he made those statements.” said his son.

At 12:30 o’clock this morning the son went to his father’s bedside. Several minutes later Dr. George W. Sharshon was called by telephone and told of Mr. Rapp’s failing condition. Shortly before the physician arrived the veteran passed away in his son’s arms. According to his son his father never lost consciousness.

The funeral will be held at the late home of the Civil War veteran, on Valley Forge Road near the East Borough Line, on Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock, with simple rites. Dr. R. S. Walker, pastor of the First Baptist Church, will be in charge. It is understood members of the G.A.R. Post and other military organizations will attend. Interment will be made in Morris Cemetery.

Mr. Rapp would have been 97 years of age on July 24, 1933, had he lived until that time. He was the son of Amos and Catherine Rapp, and was born July 24, 1836, at Rapp’s Corner. During his entire life he resided in Chester County in this vicinity.

Fought Indians in Iowa

At the age of twenty-one years. Mr. Rapp enlisted in the United States Regular Army and was sent to Northern Iowa where there was an uprising among the Indians. Although he escaped wounds, Mr. Rapp took part in several spirited engagements and in later years took great interest in telling of the time when he escaped being captured by the Indians “after a long chase.”

When the Civil War broke out he re-enlisted in the army. He joined the Union forces on 15 August 1862 at Harrisburg, as a member of Company I, 125th Regiment. Capt. Benjamin F. Bean was in charge of the company and Frederick Shunk was the vice-captain. Mr. Rapp was a sergeant in the company. In May of 1863 he was mustered out of service at Harrisburg.

Was In Major Battles

During his enlistment in the army he took part in the following encounters: skirmish at Kearneyville, 16 October 1862; battle of Fredericksburg, 13 December 1862; and the five-day battle of Chancellorsville, commencing on 1 May 1863.

After the war he married Marietta Stauffer, who passed away at the age of 88 years, just two years ago. Two children were born to the union, Harry C. Rapp, who resides at the Rapp home in Schuylkill township, and Carrie Anderson, who passed away at the age of 12 years.

A Carpenter by Trade

After the Civil War Mr. Rapp became a carpenter and worked with Jesse Jarrett, one of the leading contractors in Montgomery County. Until his retirement at the age of 82, Mr. Rapp worked day in and day out at his trade. Many of the older homes in Phoenixville are a product of Mr. Rapp’s workmanship.

No brothers or sisters survive the deceased man. There were eight sons and daughters in the family and with the passing of Jacob Rapp the family of Amos and Catherine Rapp has become extinct.

Mr. Rapp was an active member of the Josiah White Post, G.A.R, and served as its commander at one time. He was always interested in political affairs in Phoenixville and Schuylkill township, although he never aspired to office.

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Obituary – Thursday October 27, 1932 Phoenixville

FULL MILITARY RITES MARKED RAPP’S BURIAL

96-Year-Old Phoenixville Veteran Accorded Honors Yesterday;

Interment in Morris Cemetery

Impressive military services marked the burial of Jacob Rapp, 96-year-old veteran of Indian battles and the Civil War, yesterday afternoon, with Dr. R. S. Walker, pastor of the First Baptist Church, officiating.

The services were conducted at his late residence on Valley Forge Road near Corner Stores. Four of his Comrades, Samuel Green, Edward McDonough, Albert Butts and Isiah March, attended the services. Three other surviving members of the G.A.R. Did not attend because of illness.

Simple rites were conducted by Dr. Walker at the late residence. Two members of the Samuel A. Whitaker Post, American Legion, acted as honor guards. Relatives of the veteran were pallbearers as follows: Jacob Rapp, Harry C. Rapp, jr., George Smith, Wm. Thomas, Samuel Cox and Christ Schmidt.

The color bearers were Jesse Neuman and Forrest Trick, with John W. Shaffer as the bugler. The firing squad of the American Legion, comprised of Leroy Reber, commander; Fred Troxell, Russell Patterson, Elmer E. Schaeffer, Ralph Snyder, William Hopple, Grant L. Rapp and Arthur Wood, fired several volleys over the grave.

At Morris Cemetery where interment was made, members of the Legion conducted the G.A.R. Ritual services. Three volleys were fired and taps were sounded.

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

George Soule… 1590-1677

Ancestral Men of Faith

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Signed the 1620 Mayflower Compact

The first legal social contract composed signed in the New World,                   397 years ago by the Mayflower Separatist. One of whom was…                             George Soule Sr. 1590-1677, 9th GG father

Mayflower Line.The Mayflower Compact

was a legal social contract that bound the Pilgrims together when they arrived in New England. The majority of the First Mayflower passengers were Separatists, extreme members of a Puritan sect that had split from the Church of England.

All Separatists were Puritans, but not all Puritan were Separatists. Non-separatist Puritans stayed with the Church of England (protestant) advocating for change away from the influence of the Catholic Church.

On November 11, 1620, needing to maintain order and establish a civil society, the adult male passengers signed The Mayflower Compact.

Pilgrims Signing the Mayflower Compact - Plimoth Plantation
George Soule Sr.   1590-1677, 9th GG father

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In 1802, John Quincy Adams described the agreement as

“the only instance in human history of that positive, original, social compact” and it is popularly believed to have influenced the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution”

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The Text of The Mayflower Compact

In the name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord King James, by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France, and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith, etc.

Having undertaken for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith and Honour of our King and Country, a Voyage to plant the First Colony in the Northern Parts of Virginia, do by these presents solemnly and mutually in the presence of God and one of another, Covenant and Combine ourselves together in a Civil Body Politic, for our better ordering and preservation and furtherance of the ends aforesaid; and by virtue hereof to enact, constitute and frame such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the general good of the Colony, unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witness whereof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cape Cod, the 11th of November, in the year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord King James, of England, France and Ireland the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini 1620.

 

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Abraham Op den Graff… 1651–1731 Ancestral Men of Faith

Signed the 1688 Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery.                       The first organized protest against slavery in the Americas was composed 329 years ago in 1688 by four Germantown Quakers, Two of whom were my family.

Garret Hendericks;                Derick up de Graeff – 10th Great Uncle;       Francis daniell Pastorius;     Abraham up Den Graeft – 9th Great Grandfather

op den Graef signature

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Ancestral Men of Faith

Abraham Isacks Op den GRAFF  1651–1731                                                              9th Great Grandfather.

Born in Krefeld, Germany                                                                                     Died in Perkiomen, Montgomery, Pennsylvania

Op den Graeff, an old Krefeld Mennonite family, ‘turned’ Quaker abt. 1679. Brothers, Abraham, Herman, and Dirck, were among the thirteen Krefeld Emegrants of 1683. The first 13 families to settle Germantown, Pa., arriving     at Philadelphia from Germany on 6 October 1683.

Some descendants continued in / returned to the Mennonite faith. They settled in Skippack, Montgomery County, Pa. and founded ongoing congregations.

 

The Germantown Protest… 1688

The 1688 Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery was the first protest       against Negro slavery made by a religious body in the English colonies.

 

The Germantown Protest 1688

This is from our meeting at Germantown, held ye 18 of the 2 month, 1688,
to be delivered to the Monthly Meeting at Richard Worrell’s.

In response to fellow Quaker/Mennonite families in Germantown, Pa,                       who wished to practice slavery.

These are the reasons why we are against the traffik of men-body, as followeth. Is there any that would be done or handled at this manner? viz., to be sold or made a slave for all the time of his life? How fearfuland faint-hearted are many on sea when they see a strange vessel -being afraid it should be a Turk, and they should be taken, and sold for slaves into Turkey. Now what is this better done, as Turks doe? Yea, rather is it worse for them which say they are Christians, for we hear that ye most part of such negers are brought hitherto against their will and consent and that many of them are stolen. Now tho they are black we cannot conceive there is more liberty to have them slaves, as it is to have other white ones. There is a saying that we shall doe to all men like as we will be done ourselves; making no difference of what generation, descent or colour they are. And those who steal or rob men, and those who buy or purchase them, are they not alike? Here is liberty of conscience wch is right and reasonable; here ought to be likewise liberty of ye body, except of evil-doers, wch is an other case. But to bring men hither, or to rob and sell them against their will, we stand against. In Europe there are many oppressed for conscience sake; and here there are those oppossd who are of a black colour. And we who know that men must not commit adultery -some do commit adultery, in others, separating wives from their husbands and giving them to others; and some sell the children of these poor creatures to other men. Ah! doe consider well this thing, you who doe it, if you would be done at this manner? and if it is done according to Christianity? You surpass Holland and Germany in this thing. This makes an ill report in all those countries of Europe, where they hear off, that ye Quakers doe here handel men as they handle there ye cattle. And for that reason some have no mind or inclination to come hither. And who shall maintain this your cause, or pleid for it? Truly we can not do so, except you shall inform us better hereof, viz., that Christians have liberty to practise these things. Pray, what thing in the world can be done worse towards us, than if men should rob or steal us away, and sell us for slaves to strange countries; separating housbands from their wives and children. Being now this is not done in the manner we would be done at therefore we contradict and are against this traffic of men- body. And we who profess that it is not lawful to steal, must, likewise, avoid to purchase such things as are stolen, but rather help to stop this robbing and stealing if possible. And such men ought to be delivered out of ye hands of ye robbers, and set free as well as in Europe. Then is Pennsylvania to have a good report, instead it hath now a bad one for this sake in other countries. Especially whereas ye Europeans are desirous to know in what manner ye Quakers doe rule in their province — and most of them doe look upon us with an envious eye. But if this is done well, what shall we say is done evil?

If once these slaves (wch they say are so wicked and stubborn men) should joint themselves — fight for their freedom, — and handel their masters and mastrisses as they did handel them before; will these masters and mastrisses take the sword at hand and warr against these poor slaves, licke, we are able to believe, some will not refuse to doe; or have these negers not as much right to fight for their freedom, as you have to keep them slaves?

Now consider well this thing, if it is good or bad? And in case you find it to be good to handel these blacks at that manner, we desire and require you hereby lovingly that you may inform us herein, which at this time never was done, viz., that Christians have such a liberty to do so. To the end we shall be satisfied in this point, and satisfie likewise our good friends and acquaintances in our natif country, to whose it is a terror, or fairful thing that men should be handeld so in Pennsylvania.

Signed

Garret Hendericks;                Derick up de Graeff; – 10th Great Uncle.

Francis daniell Pastorius;     Abraham up Den Graeft – 9th Great Grandfather.

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Rev. Gerard Beekman… 1558–1625 Ancestral Men of Faith

Translated The Original Bible Manuscripts into English, The King James Version

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Ancestral Men of Faith

Rev. Gerard Beekman 1558-1625                                                                                 11th Great Grandfather

He lived most of his life at Cologne on the Rhine. Died at Mülheim, Germany

The Beekmans were steadfast Protestants from the time that Martin Luther       in 1521 protested against the corruptions of the Church of Rome.

Gerardus Beekman received a University education and studied theology at Frankendale in the Palatinate Region, during the years 1576-78. He became one of the most learned scholars of his time. He is said to have been able to “speak, think and dream” in five languages.

He lived during the unsettling times succeeding the religious movement begun by Martin Luther, when a fanatical warfare was waged between the Roman Catholics and the followers of the reformed religion.

The persecution of Protestants by the Archbishop of Cologne was the cause of Gerardus’ settling in the neighboring city of Mülheim, a refuge for Protestants. Rev. Gerard Beekman took a prominent part in the support of the principles of the new church and was chosen one of the delegates to visit the Duke of New Berg, the Elector of Brandenburg and James I to secure their support in behalf of the reformed religion.

He was a distinguished theologian and one of the distinguished scholars who translated the Bible from the original manuscripts into English, The King James Version, for King James I.   -This is the Version we use.

He received special honors from the King for his services.

King James I. granted the family a remodeled and special Family Crest.

Beekman_coat_of_arms

“Distinguished Families in America, Descended from Willhelmus Beekman & Jan Thomasse VanDyke” by William B. Aitken. A.M., Ph.D. Illustrated by the author. New York & London, The Knickerbocker Press, G.P. Putnam’s Sons. published 1912, 316 pages

 

It is of interest to note here that,

the Beekmans have always been large landowners, and their preference has always been for a water view from their home estates, whether it was on the Rhine; on the Hudson or East Rivers of New York; or the Raritan or Millstone Rivers of New Jersey.

When the Princess of Portugal visited Holland in the seventeenth century the Dutch government received the permission of the Beekman family then residing at Nijmegen to hold the reception in her honor at their house.

 

The name Beekman is from “beck,” the Dutch for “mouth,” the English “beak,”          or it maybe an abbreviation of “bekken,” the Dutch word for basin.

According to Putnam’s Historic New York, “Beekman or the man of the brook;           this interpretation of the name was recognized by King James I. of England,           when he granted to the Rev. Mr. (Gerard) Beekman, grandfather of William,               as a coat of arms, a rivulet running between roses.” The crest is three feathers             on a helmet of steel represented in profile. The motto is: Mens conscia Recti.

This coat of arms was used by the grandson Wihelmus Beekman in his correspondence with Governor Stuyvesant.

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Gerardus Wiltsee… 1735–1800 Revolutionary War Patriot

 

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War Patriot

Gerardus Wiltsse   1735–1800
5th Great Grandfather, DAR Ancestor

Private – Albany Co., New York Militia

under Col. Cornelius Van Veghten, 13th regt.

He was born in Newtown, Queens, New York.

He died in Wilsey Hill, Herkimer, New York

The Wiltzee line arrived in the New World in 1623.                                             They were one of the families with first original Dutch Migration settling The Dutch Colony of New Amsterdam, as part of the Dutch West Indies Company. They were financiers and fur traders.
Gerardus’ 2nd Great Grandfather Philippe, was massacred by indians in 1632 at Fort Zwaanendael in Delaware. (Philippe was our 9th Great Grandfather)
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All his lines were from the Netherlands and were here by the mid 1600’s.
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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

 

Nicholas Slough… 1757–1834 Revolutionary War Patriot

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War Patriot 

Nicholas SLOUGH 1757–1834
5th Great Grandfather, DAR & SAR Patriot Ancestor

Service: Pennsylvania Rank: Private
1) Col Wm. Dean, Capt Jacob Peterman, Phila Co.
2) Associators & Militiamen

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle