A Memorial Day Poem

We Cannot Thank The Fallen, They are Not Here

We cannot thank the Fallen, they are not Here,
We can thank the Loved ones that they held Dear.
Be thankful for your Freedoms for which they Died.
Remembering the reasons, will keep their spirit Alive,
Through the decades as we Live, Love, and Pray,
We have them to Thank for allowing us, to Live this Way.
-DRD 26 May 2017

God Bless them, One and All.

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This poem was written with a special young family in mind.                                         They like many before them had lost their All in Afghanistan.

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All Gave Some
Some Gave All

WW I – Great Uncle Elmer McAuley -KIA Normandy
WW II – Uncle Bill McAuley -KIA Siapan
among the many, Thank You and Rest in Peace.

Remember in your Prayers, Them & The Families They Left Behind. – Omaeagle.

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Textiles In The Blood – Scottish Weavers

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Francis IRVINE… 1846–1924

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I Love Textiles – Genetic DNA Memory?

I Love Brocade, Tapestry, Velvet, all heavy woven fabrics like: tweed, twill, and linen. Especially old Lace, whether it be heavy knit /woven or fine delicate old lace. I Love The touch, feel, weight and look of well made fabric. I guess that came through my ancestral genes.

One of the last of my ancestral lines to emigrate to the U.S.A. was my maternal grandmother’s family. The Irvines and the Symes, were both born in Pollokshaws, Renfrewshire, Scotland. Pollokshaws was historically a village predominantly dedicated to weaving. In the 1700’s through the 1800’s they were known for their exceptional weaving skills.

The early mills of Philadelphia were mostly carpet mills and the carpets were hand-loomed. The tradition of hand-looms continued on into the 1880’s. As the textile trade in Philadelphia began to expand to include curtains, woolens, etc., the owners built and modernized their factories into steam powered mills.

My 2nd Great Grandfather Francis Irvine was a loom master /weaver. In the 1880’s when they were setting up the steam powered Textile Mills in Philadelphia, they went to Scotland to recruit him. They brought his whole family of 10 over, complete with their furniture. (The family always joked about my 2nd great aunt Mary being a ‘stowaway’, because my 2nd great grandmother Barbara Syme was pregnant with her at the time.)

* IRVINE, Francis

STAY Tuned… for the next story.

Genetic DNA Memory? Funny thing is 80 years later, his Great Granddaughter Helen (My Mother), also worked in a Philadelphia textile mills. A Bromley Mill that had once been a carpet mill, then converted into a Curtain Mill, and later Tablecloths and Scarves. Quaker Lace.

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parents, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,               and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Our Park Map Placemats

Our Outdoor Memories Memorialized.

When our children were young, from preschool on, we would take different park maps and seal them in acetate. We would use them as Placemats for all our meals. When they were very young we explained to them, that it was like we were looking down from the clouds at the park. When we sat at the table, we would look them over to familiarize ourselves with the layout of the parks that we were planning to visit and camp during that season. We would point out the lakes and streams, and the trails that we wanted to try. We would talk about the trails that we have hiked and the many discoveries found on those trails. Through the years, we would mark up the maps with those discoveries, like, where is ‘Our Blueberry Hill’ or ‘Our Raspberry Row’, ‘Our Hidden Bubbling Brook’, ‘Our Special Fishing Spots’, the Best Views, etc.

We would take the Park Map Placemats to camp with us and constantly refer back to them. When we went hiking, we would carry, a marked up, folded map.. As we adventured, we would make additional notes. Once we were back home we would come to an agreement as to what was to be added to the Park Placemat Map.

We still use them to this day. The kids are grown and gone with families of their own. On occasion we were lucky enough to use the Park Map Placemats with our Grandchildren. We all Loved them, what Wonderful memories they hold, ‘Our Secret Spots’, ‘Our Hidden Hideaways’, Our Family’s Personal Park History.

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P.S. The Bonus was: Our children learned to read many kinds of maps at a very young age, and even how to use the Compass, and how to Navigate by the Sun, etc. They were never afraid to set out on an Adventure with map in hand.  🙂

Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,            and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

George Denny Clemens Ancestral Men of Faith

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George Denny Clemens / Clement   1615–1660

A Puritan, beheaded in 1660 for his faith.

My 9th Great Grandfather.

George Clement, son of George and Audry (Denny) Clements, became Puritans and he along with ten or twelve others, were beheaded in the year 1660, upon the restoration of the crown to Charles II, for having signed with Oliver Cromwell and fifty-seven others, the warrant for the execution of Charles the First.

At the end of the first war Charles, the First was being held by the Scottish Presbyterian Army, who handed him over to the parliamentary forces.  George Clemens, a member of British parliament 1647 London, England, Puritan and Mennonite, 1647 a member of British Parliament and was 1 of 59 who signed the death warrant for King Charles I, thus beheaded.

In January 1649 a trial was arranged, comprising 135 commissioners. Some were informed beforehand of their summons, and refused to participate, but most were named without their consent being sought. Forty-seven of those named did not appear either in the preliminary closed sessions or the subsequent public trial. At the end of the four-day trial, 57 of the commissioners present signed the death warrant; two further commissioners added their names subsequently. The following day, 30 January, Charles I was beheaded outside the Banqueting House in Whitehall; Charles II went into exile. The English Monarchy was replaced with, at first, the Commonwealth of England (1649–53) and then the Protectorate (1653–59) under Cromwell’s personal rule.

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Genealogical History of the Gottshall Family,                                                   descendants of Rev. Jacob Gottshall. With complete record of the descendants of William Ziegler Gottshall, Compiled by Rev. N. B. Grubb. Published by The Gottshall Family Association 1924. 128 pgs.

THE CLEMENS FAMILY

Mr. Lewis Waldemar Clemens, of the Royal Colonial Institute, of Toronto, Canada, has for a number of years untiringly searched the family records of the Clemens family back through the archives of Ottawa and has carefully traced the ancestry of the official records of England and Holland, with such success that his complete work has been passed upon by The College of Arms, England, and after strict scrutiny has received the official approval of that institution.

Mr. Clemens traced an unbroken record of the family ancestry back to the sixteenth century, to

I) Clement of Toft, Lincolnshire, England. He was the father of

II) William Clement, of Wissingsett, Norfolkshire, to whom in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, in the year 1563, the Family Arms were granted by the visitation of Norfolk,. made by William Harvey, Clarencieux King of Arms, South of Trent.. and confirmed by John Raven, Richmond Herald. in the year 1613.  The wife of William Clement was one Arm Nernon. They had three children, George, Thomas and Edmund.

III) George Clement, married Audry Denny daughter of John Denny, of Chishunt, and widow of John Haydon, of Longham.

IV) George Clement, son of George and Audry, became Puritans and together with ten or twelve, others were beheaded in the year 1660, upon the restoration of the crown to Charles, for having signed with Oliver Cromwell and fifty-seven others, the warrant for the execution of Charles the First, 1648.  They had a son Jacob.

V) Jacob Clement, born 1651, was nine years old when his father, George Clement, was beheaded.  He and his elder brother John also became Puritans and when Jacob was eighteen years of age, the two brothers came out to America in 1669. Jacob afterwards returned to England and in 1677 he was married there to a woman whose Christian name only has been recorded, Mary.

V) Jacob CLEMENS (1651-1684) married Maria Mary BARTHOLOMEW (1658–1684), Like most Puritans, Anabaptist, etc., they fled England, and lived in the Netherlands to avoid Religious Persecution.

VI) Gerhardt ‘Garret’ Bartholomew CLEMENS (1680–1745) was born in the Netherlands, married Anneli “Anna” Hiestand REIFF (1682–’1745′) born in Alzheim, Switzerland. They were married in The Netherlands in 1702.

They Emigrated in 1709 to Salford, Philadelphia  County, now Montgomery County Penna. They were a Prominent Family in the Salford Mennonite Community.

CLEMENS, Family Memorial Stone at Salford Mennonite Cemetery

  • Gerhardt ‘Garret’ CLEMENS 1680-1745 and
  • Anneli ‘Anna’ REIFF 1682-1745
  • Their Children:
    • Johannes ‘John’ Clemens 1707-unk and wife Elizabeth
    • Elizabeth Anna Clemens 1712-1793 and
    • husband Valentine Kratz 1747-1834
    • Jacob Clemens 1703-1782 and
    • and wife Barbara Clymer 1714-1777
    • Abraham Clemens 1710-1776 and
    • wife Catherine.
  1. Clement of Toft…                                                         My 12th GG Father
  2. William Clement & Ann Nernon                                 My 11th GG Parents
  3. George Clement & Audry Denny                                My 10th GG Parents
  4. George Clement                                                         My 9th GG Father
  5. Jacob Clemens & Maria Mary Bartholomew              My 8th GG Parents
  6. Gerhardt ‘Garret’ Clemens & Anneli “Anna” Reiff     My 7th GG Parents

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parents, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,               and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Goodbye November

A Rough Month

November was a very emotional month for me.

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There was of course the normal stuff, paying bills, going to many doctors, etc.

There was the very emotional three week visit from my daughter and her spouse. My Daughter has lived in Scotland for 11 years now.  We have not seen her in 3 years. They came ‘home’ for an proper American Thanksgiving with the family. They swooped in, and we all ran around like ‘Loons’. We did Historic Philadelphia; Longwood Gardens; We saw Annie in Philly; and ate at many Vegan restaurants. They went to Wellsboro to visit family at their cabin property and see the Pa. Grand Canyon; then they went out to see Fallingwater, the  Frank Lloyd Wright House; They returned to our house, then they were off to spend several days in New York City visiting with friends, seeing Miss Saigon, the New York Philharmonic, etc.

Then before I knew it, we were saying our goodbyes through sobs and tears. Not knowing when we will see each other again.

The final heartbreaks for me was…

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on the 10th Belle the 16 year old Border Collie died,
on the 28th Tyler the 14+ year old Cocker died.

Our 3 Black dogs 2004Belle on LawnTyler & Rock

I can no longer find my voice.

I have nothing left to say.
I can no longer post,
I can no longer blog.

 

Thanks for listening.

Our Mayflower Lines… Plymouth Colony to Pennsylvania

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Minnie Adelade Willse, 1883–1952

Our Grandmother Minnie was born in New Amsterdam, New York.                   On her father Constant D Willse’s line, she is Netherlands Dutch and Mayflower English.

She’s a descendant of two of the First Original Migrations to The Americas.

The Mayflower Separatist (Saints) whom landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts in 1620, and The Netherlands Dutch with the Dutch West India Trading Company whom migrated to settle New Amsterdam in 1623.

The Mayflower Saints landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts in 1620.

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This is the our Mayfower direct line.

George SOULE Sr.    (1590 – 1677)   9th GG fatherMayflower Line.
– signed The Mayflower Compact
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George Soule Jr.        (1624-1704)     8th GG father
Mary Soule                (1680-1726)     7th GG mother
Joseph Devol Jr.        (1703-1782)     6th GG father
Isabel Devol              (1724-1800)     5th GG mother
Peabody Cook           (1767-1850)     4th GG father
Lucy Ann Cook         (1797-1870)     3rd GG mother
Constant C Willse     (1824-1910)     2nd GG father
Constant D Willse    (1864-1953)     GG father
Minnie A Willse       (1883-1952)     Grandmother
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Our Mayflower linage, thus far.

  1. Anderson, Isabel Elizabeth – born 1621 • Massachusetts
  2. Adley / Audley, John (William) – born 1602 • England
  3. Beckett, William – born 1530 • England
  4. Borden, Henry – born 1370 • England
  5. Briggs, Henrie – born 1574 • England
  6. Briggs, John – born 1624 • Rhode Island
  7. Butterbutler, Agnes – born ‘1525’ • England
  8. Classez, Eechje – born 1680 • New York
  9. Cook / Cooke, Thomas – born 1569 • England
  10. Cornell, Thomas – born 1595 • England
  11. Devol, Richard – born 1530 • England
  12. Eldred, Alyce – born 1570 • England
  13. Felkes, Margaret – born 1576 • England
  14. Fisher, Edward – born 1616 • England
  15. Fowle, Richard – born ‘1514’ • England
  16. Hill, Henry – born 1540 • England
  17. Hills, Susan – born 1548 • England
  18. Hinckes, Mary – born ‘1575’ • England
  19. Iden,Margaret – born 1540 • England
  20. Lang, Margaret – born 1580 • England
  21. Lawton, George – born 1581 • England
  22. Leigh, Ann – born 1530 • England
  23. Muller, Michael – born ‘1600’ • Germany
  24. Odding, George – born 1585 • England
  25. Peabody, Hannah – born 1700 • Rhode Island
  26. Pickard / Pickert, Bartholomew – born ‘1650’ • England
  27. Potter, George – born 1584 • England
  28. Reeder, Joan – born 1572 • England
  29. Salisbury, Thomas – born ‘1589’ • England
  30. Sherman, Henry – born ‘1520’ England
  31. Smith, Isabell – born 1585 • England
  32. Smith, Richi – born ‘1580’ • England
  33. Soule, William – born ‘1565’ • England
  34. Stokes, Elizabeth – born 1638 • Massachusetts
  35. Taylor, Martha – born ‘1590’ • England
  36. Thomas, George – born 1620 • Massachusetts
  37. Tomor / Tornor, Thomas – born 1397 • England
  38. Uebele / Ubelin, Hans Wilhelm – born ‘1625’ • German
  39. Walreth, Johann – born ‘1700’ • Germany
  40. Ward, Philippa – born 1577 • England
  41. Weare, Joan – born ‘1675’ • England
  42. Weiser, Jacob – born ‘1590’ • Germany
  43. Westcott, Rebecca – born 1605 • England
  44. Wilber / Wilbore, Dorothy – born 1617 • England

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Read about George Soule Sr. and The Mayflower Compact. The first legal social contract composed in the New World. >  George Soule… 1590-1677

Read about our Thanksgiving tradition of reflecting on our ancestors and their First ‘Harvest Thanksgiving’. >  Holiday Foods – Thanksgiving

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

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I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,    and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Our New Netherlands Dutch Line… 1623 Fort Orange, New Amsterdam to Penna.

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Minnie Adelade Willse, 1883–1952

Our Grandmother Minnie was born in New Amsterdam, New York.                   On her father Constant D Willse’s line, she is Netherlands Dutch and Mayflower English.

She’s a descendant of two of the First Original Migrations to The Americas.

The Mayflower Separatist (Saints) whom landed at Plymouth Rock, Massachusetts in 1620, and The Netherlands Dutch with the Dutch West India Trading Company whom migrated to settle New Amsterdam in 1623.

The Netherlands Dutch Migration to Settle New Amsterdam in 1623.

Philippe Maten Wiltsee and his family were of the detail of eighteen families sent by The Dutch West India Trading Company to Fort Orange in 1623. He assisted in building Fort Orange and Fort William. The family remained at Fort Orange until they removed to Manhattan in 1626.

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Fort Orange
                    Fort Orange, New Amsterdam

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Our New Amsterdam, New Netherlands direct line.

 

Philippe Maton Wiltsee    (1570-1632)        9th GG father
Hendrick M. Wiltsee         (1623-1712)        8th GG father
Theunis H. Wiltsee            (1674-1741)        7th GG father
Hendrick T. Wiltsee          (1702-1794)        6th GG father
Gerardus Wiltsee              (1735-1800)        5th GG father
James Wiltsie                     (1759-1844)        4th GG father
Hiram Wilsey                    (1795-1880)        3rd GG father
Constant C Willse             (1824-1910)        2nd GG father
Constant D Willse            (1864-1953)         Great Grandfather
Minnie A Willse               (1883-1952)         Grandmother
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Our New Netherlands linage traced back, thus far.

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  1. Abeel, Jan – born 1593 • Netherland
  2. Baudertius, William (Rev.) – born 1573 • Netherlands
  3. Beekman, Cornelius – born 1528 Germany
  4. Croon / Kroons, Jan – born 1597 • Netherlands
  5. DeBough, Frederick – born ‘1600’ • Netherlands
  6. Huygens, Christiana – born 1528 • Germany
  7. Martens, Barbara – born 1570 • Netherlands
  8. Meyrinck / Meyers, Jan – born 1600 Netherlands
  9. Pinkeney, Thomas – born ‘1675’ • New Amsterdam?
  10. Slagboom, Antonia – born 1593 Netherlands
  11. Straitsman, Teuntje – born ‘1600′ Netherlands
  12. Stunning, Agnes – born 1557 Germany
  13. Ter Bosch, Sophia – born 1598 • Netherlands
  14. Van De Boog, Isaac – born 1677 • Netherlands
  15. Van Vleck / Van Kleek, Hester – born 1681 • Netherlands
  16. Van Voorhies, Sarah – born 1763 • New York
  17. Ward, Sarah – born 1715 • New York
  18. Wilsey / Wiltsee, Philippe – born 1570 • Netherlands

 

Some of our ancestors from this line.

 

I will post about Our Mayflower Line next

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past, and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle