Recycling Clothes… 4

Quilts

 

I Mean Really Recycling… 

by donating, repurposing or actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

 

Preparing to Repurpose…

 

For the Quilts:

  • I cut heavy-duty plastic into 12 x 12, 8 x 8, and 6 x 6 square templates.
  • I cut the materials into desired sizes.
  • I separate them by size, materials, and colors into individual ziplock bags.
  • Save special items in their own bags: pockets, logos, zippers, buttons, etc.
  • I store the bags in see-through container.
  • Once I am ready to start a project, I can see all I have on hand at a glance.

 

 

 

My Quilt for Daughter

My quilt for BLD

 

Read the story about our Family Quilts here: Recycling Clothes… 2

 

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Recycling Clothes… 3

Rag Rugs

 

I Mean Really Recycling… 

by donating, repurposing or actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

 

Preparing to Repurpose…

 

For the Rag Rugs:

  • I cut the material into 1 to 1.5 inch strips. (depending on it’s thickness)
  • I begin to wind it into a ball, like yarn
  • I knot the ends together as I go. (I have occasionally sewn the ends.)
  • Store in see-through bin.

 

Rag Rugs in the works…

 

Finished Chair Cushions

mint seat cushionseat cushionf

 

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Recycling Clothes… 2

I Mean Really Recycling…

by donating, repurposing or actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

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The Denim Quilt – Winter 1979-80

I made this denim quilt, while pregnant with my first daughter,                 during the long winter nights of 1979-80.

Denim quilt -winter 1979-80
38 year old denim quilt – made in Winter Nights of 1979-80

It is not as bright and beautiful as it has once been.                                                 It does need some attention and new ‘stuffing’, but boy, does it have a history. First there’s the history behind each and every pair of 1960’s & 70’s jeans in it. Then there is the 38 years of history it has seen…

  • The ‘Huggles’ and Cuddles
  • The Bedtime Stories
  • The ‘Friday Girls Night’ movies
  • and last but not least The Confidential talks

It has secret pockets and zippers, where the girls liked to hide things. 🙂

.

22 years later…

I made this for that very same daughter in Winter 2001-02,                         while she was completing her Undergraduate Degree.  😀

The Daughter’s Denim Quilt – Winter 2001-02

My quilt for BLD

I wonder what ‘history’ this Quilt will hold after 38 years.                            I hope them to all be Wonderful.

Read about it here on my Daughter’s Blog…

https://riotflower.wordpress.com/2012/12/13/mama-comfort/

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Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Recycling Clothes… 1

I Mean Really Recycling…

by donating, repurposing and actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

.

However…

When the children outgrew their clothes, if they were still in good shape… I would clean and mend, then place them in bags marked with the gender, size and season.

Because…

Here in our area school district there were many children that did not even have underwear. (Sometimes it comes down to a choice… food or underwear?)

So I would also collect clothing from friends and neighbors. Jackets, hats, gloves, pants, tee shirts, socks and especially underpants. I would then process them, I would clean and mend, then place them in bags marked with the gender, size and season for the school nurse to give out as needed.

It was a labor of Love, I was Blessed with a Happy, Healthy Family, and wanted to share some of that warmth and love with the little ones of my community.  I believe in the ‘Ripple Effect’

th.

We all can help strengthen our Community, one baby step at a time.

What are some of your ideas?

Check out: Real Recycling… Back in the day.

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

My Camp Kitchen Box

 

Decades of Camping…

Have allowed me to refine my camp kitchen. Whether it be Tent, Van, Cabin, R.V. or Scout Troop camping. If Backpacking, a few items are chosen for a solo mess kit. All of my Camp Kitchen needs, and more fit into an old Rubbermaid file box, my Kitchen Box.

Camp Kitchen Box
My Camp Kitchen Box

 

The Pots, Pans and Dishes

  • Peak Stainless Steel Cookware and Dishes: Three cook pots, 3, 2 and 1.3 quart; four lid / fry pans 7”, 6”, 5” and 4½”; four 9” plates; two 6” plates; 6 cup / bowls with handles 6, 8 and 12 oz.; four soup / serve bowls; another 12 oz. coffee cup; four 2 oz. sauce cups; a tea ball.
  • Stainless steel coffee pot, folding 11” fry pan; a S.S. strainer; a S.S. steamer; a steel spatula; a cooking / serving spoon; juicer/ mixer/ measurer; a box of utensils; a can opener; 4 kabob skewers; telescoping roasting forks; a ladle; a pot hook/ hanger; tongs; a cutting mat; 6 plastic nesting cups; shower cap bowl covers.

 

How to Assemble 25 pieces

  • Place the three cook pots, 3, 2 and 1.3 quart together
  • Place in one set of the three cup w handles 12, 8, and 6 oz.
  • Place on top of them the other set of the cup w handles 12, 8, and 6 oz.
  • Place in the four 2 oz. sauce cups with the tea ball in them
  • Place on top of them the 4½”, then the 5″ lid / fry pan
  • Top with the two 6″ plates
  • Place on top the 6″, then the 7″ lid / fry pan
  • Place the 11″ folding fry pan
  • Top all off with the four 9” plates

 

The Miscellany

Kitchen box miscellany

  • 2  one-mantle compact PerfectFlow propane lanterns in cushioned case
  • 40 oz. Juice Pitchers (plus for mixing, blueberry picking, and storage)
  • Travel Brita filter
  • Tablecloth and clips
  • Clotheslines, clothes pins, and shower rings in fanny pack.
  • Spray vinegar or bleach water
  • Aluminum foil
  • ½ bar Fels Naphtha
  • Hammock
  • Camp toaster
  • Trash Bags (2)
  • Fly swatter

 

 All in The Box 😀

  • Place the pots, pans, and dishes stack in.
  • Then the coffee pot (baggie of coffee, etc. can be stored inside)
  • The steamer folds up, and fits nicely into the strainer, then they’re placed into the four bowls. (in front of the coffee pot)
  • The Travel Brita filter fits inside the 40 oz. Juice Pitchers (lower right)
  • The six plastic nesting cups fit into the 12 oz. coffee cup (left hand side)
  • I then place the fanny pack of clotheslines, etc. into the bottom
  • Then I lay the compact propane lanterns in case, on top of fanny pack
  • The hammock in red bag goes on the cups in the corner
  • Then fill in all the spaces… the cutting mat and tablecloth go in the lid.

 

Hints, Tips, and Tricks

  • The I ❤ Love Scouting fanny pack is clipped around a tree. We string up the line, and the clothes pins are near. The shower rings are for hanging items with loops, mess kits, ditty bags, hats, etc.
  • The juice pitchers, we freeze juice or water in for the ice chest. At camp we use them for many things, mixing, shaking, and storing food, We put them in water bottle carriers for foraging and blueberry picking. The lid is a pour spout, we just put the berries through the hole, with no fear of spilling.
  • Fels Naphtha, use for: hand washing; washing off poison ivy oils; soaping the bottom of pots that are placed on the fire, it assists in clean up.
  • Spray vinegar to use for: sunburn; wipe to disinfect the table and repel flies; clean fruits and veggies; spray on for flavor.
  • We really do not use the camp toaster, we use pie irons, or the roasting forks but we carry it for those who want to try it out.

 

Do you like camping? Stay tuned, more to come…

My Camp & Outdoor Adventures Pages

A. SHELTER
B. KITCHEN
    1. Fire Box                    
    2. Kitchen box √                    
    3. Wash box          
    4. Food box          
    5. Cooler Box
C. TOOLS
    1. My Emergency Bag        *Safety *Fire *Water *Shelter
    2. Ricco's Tool Bag                    *Safety *Fire
    3. Doodad Bin               (misc. safety tools)
    4. Research Bag
    5. Whatnot Bin
    6. First Aide Bin
E. Misc. Extras
    1. Game Bin
    2. Fishing Box

 

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by. – OmaEagle

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Walking My Talk

HOW DO I WALK MY CONSERVATION TALK?

Maintained a mostly Pesco-veggie diet

pre 1978 and on
  • Shopped regional and seasonal.
  • Used wax paper lunch bags.
  • Used refillable drink bottles.
  • Made all meals from scratch. -no trash
  • Bought bulk in paper bags at crate and barrel stores.
  • Cleaned with vinegar; baking soda; and Bronner’s liquid soaps.
  • Refilled bottles at our old-fashioned ‘health food’ store with: Vinegars; Bronner’s Soaps and Liquid Mineral Bouillon; Bragg’s Liquid Amino Acids.
  • Used washable rags to clean.
  • Used washable linen napkins.
  • Made rag rugs for floors.
  • Used no air conditioning.
  • Owned no dryer or dishwasher.
  • Hung all clothes to dry, either outside or inside.
  • Recycled / reclaimed old wood furniture.
  • Have a garden.
  • Rode motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles and walked a lot.
  • Drove a manual 5 speed 1978 Toyota Celica GT, 24-34 mpg. (77-90, 13 yrs)
1979 on
  • Gutted & insulated all walls in our masonry home with an R16 value.
  • Insulated crawl space and attic.
  • Used thermal or wool window drapes, kept cold out and heat in.
  • Used passive solar energy -opened curtains to let heat in during day.
  • Recycled everything: Clothes -repaired, refashioned, recycled by using in sewing and craft projects, made cleaning rags, or donated; Furniture -revamped, or donated.
  • Maintain several large Oaks for Wildlife. *They provide Our family’s share of Oxygen, and they’re natural air filters.
  • Planted apple trees, grape vines, blueberries & raspberries. We do share with wildlife.  *More Oxygen.
  • Planted a lot of Wildlife cover and hedgerows. *More Oxygen.
  • Encourage Birds for Pest Control, by providing Food, Water, Shelter.
  • Use Ladybugs, Diatomaceous earth and Milky spore for pest control.
  • Used fluorescent ceiling light fixtures in the house: 2 bedrooms; 2 bathrooms; 2 halls; 1 kitchen; 1 laundry room; and 1 office.
  • Use Leftovers and Scraps:  Freeze bits and pieces for soups;  Feed to Animals- Dogs, Cats, Rabbits, Turtles, Birds (Parrots, Chickens and Wild);  Last, but not least, Compost.
  • Fought to keep our food CLEAN (Pesticides Out of the Food Stream)Mothers & Other, with Ralph Nader.
1980 on
  • Breast fed babies.
  • Used cloth diapers, sanitized in the sun.
  • Used low watt, timed motion sensor lights in all rooms.
  • Used some compact fluorescents and LED’s in lamps.
  • Used Recycled grey water for garden.
1982 on
  • Installed a new efficient oil burner.
1985 on
  • Recycled an old tub as an inground pond and water for wildlife.
  • Recycled an old bathroom sink as a inground drip fountain for birds.
  • Reclaimed outdoor cedar plank siding and reused as attic flooring.
  • Reclaimed outdoor cedar plank siding and reused for Bunny hutch.
  • Reclaimed outdoor cedar plank siding and reused for Chicken coop.
1986 to 1998
  • Drove a 1987 Manuel 5 speed Hyundai Excel 25-31 mpg (1986-1998, 12 yrs)
1990 on
  • Installed new dual pane windows.
  • Installed new Insulated siding on 2nd floor of house.
  • Use a water-saving tumble washer. On our second one.
1992 to 2005
  • Drove a 1993 Manual 5 speed Pontiac Grand Am GT 21-31 mpg.It got 34 mpg on long trips w cruise control & overdrive.(1992-2005, 13 yrs)
2002 on
  • Drive a 2003 Pontiac Aztec, 18 – 24 mpg. We get up to 25- 31 mpg with cruise control. (2016 – still driving 14 yrs)
2005
  • Installed a water saver dual flush toilet.
  • Installed a water flow control shower.
  • Recycled an old bathtub into a raised bed herb garden.
2010
  • Installed new reflective insulating roofing shingles.
  • Installed triple pane, glazed windows on north and northwest of house.
2013
  • Installed triple pane, glazed windows on the south and southeast.
2015
  • Installed a water saver dual flush toilet in 2nd bath.
  • Installed a water flow control shower in 2nd bath.
  • Recycled another old bathtub into a raised bed garden.

omaeagle

 

 

There have been so many projects, hopefully    I will be able to cover these and more in upcoming posts. – Oma Eagle