Abraham Op den Graff… 1651–1731 Ancestral Men of Faith

Signed the 1688 Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery.                       The first organized protest against slavery in the Americas was composed 329 years ago in 1688 by four Germantown Quakers, Two of whom were my family.

Garret Hendericks;                Derick up de Graeff – 10th Great Uncle;       Francis daniell Pastorius;     Abraham up Den Graeft – 9th Great Grandfather

op den Graef signature

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Ancestral Men of Faith

Abraham Isacks Op den GRAFF  1651–1731                                                              9th Great Grandfather.

Born in Krefeld, Germany                                                                                     Died in Perkiomen, Montgomery, Pennsylvania

Op den Graeff, an old Krefeld Mennonite family, ‘turned’ Quaker abt. 1679. Brothers, Abraham, Herman, and Dirck, were among the thirteen Krefeld Emegrants of 1683. The first 13 families to settle Germantown, Pa., arriving     at Philadelphia from Germany on 6 October 1683.

Some descendants continued in / returned to the Mennonite faith. They settled in Skippack, Montgomery County, Pa. and founded ongoing congregations.

 

The Germantown Protest… 1688

The 1688 Germantown Quaker Petition Against Slavery was the first protest       against Negro slavery made by a religious body in the English colonies.

 

The Germantown Protest 1688

This is from our meeting at Germantown, held ye 18 of the 2 month, 1688,
to be delivered to the Monthly Meeting at Richard Worrell’s.

In response to fellow Quaker/Mennonite families in Germantown, Pa,                       who wished to practice slavery.

These are the reasons why we are against the traffik of men-body, as followeth. Is there any that would be done or handled at this manner? viz., to be sold or made a slave for all the time of his life? How fearfuland faint-hearted are many on sea when they see a strange vessel -being afraid it should be a Turk, and they should be taken, and sold for slaves into Turkey. Now what is this better done, as Turks doe? Yea, rather is it worse for them which say they are Christians, for we hear that ye most part of such negers are brought hitherto against their will and consent and that many of them are stolen. Now tho they are black we cannot conceive there is more liberty to have them slaves, as it is to have other white ones. There is a saying that we shall doe to all men like as we will be done ourselves; making no difference of what generation, descent or colour they are. And those who steal or rob men, and those who buy or purchase them, are they not alike? Here is liberty of conscience wch is right and reasonable; here ought to be likewise liberty of ye body, except of evil-doers, wch is an other case. But to bring men hither, or to rob and sell them against their will, we stand against. In Europe there are many oppressed for conscience sake; and here there are those oppossd who are of a black colour. And we who know that men must not commit adultery -some do commit adultery, in others, separating wives from their husbands and giving them to others; and some sell the children of these poor creatures to other men. Ah! doe consider well this thing, you who doe it, if you would be done at this manner? and if it is done according to Christianity? You surpass Holland and Germany in this thing. This makes an ill report in all those countries of Europe, where they hear off, that ye Quakers doe here handel men as they handle there ye cattle. And for that reason some have no mind or inclination to come hither. And who shall maintain this your cause, or pleid for it? Truly we can not do so, except you shall inform us better hereof, viz., that Christians have liberty to practise these things. Pray, what thing in the world can be done worse towards us, than if men should rob or steal us away, and sell us for slaves to strange countries; separating housbands from their wives and children. Being now this is not done in the manner we would be done at therefore we contradict and are against this traffic of men- body. And we who profess that it is not lawful to steal, must, likewise, avoid to purchase such things as are stolen, but rather help to stop this robbing and stealing if possible. And such men ought to be delivered out of ye hands of ye robbers, and set free as well as in Europe. Then is Pennsylvania to have a good report, instead it hath now a bad one for this sake in other countries. Especially whereas ye Europeans are desirous to know in what manner ye Quakers doe rule in their province — and most of them doe look upon us with an envious eye. But if this is done well, what shall we say is done evil?

If once these slaves (wch they say are so wicked and stubborn men) should joint themselves — fight for their freedom, — and handel their masters and mastrisses as they did handel them before; will these masters and mastrisses take the sword at hand and warr against these poor slaves, licke, we are able to believe, some will not refuse to doe; or have these negers not as much right to fight for their freedom, as you have to keep them slaves?

Now consider well this thing, if it is good or bad? And in case you find it to be good to handel these blacks at that manner, we desire and require you hereby lovingly that you may inform us herein, which at this time never was done, viz., that Christians have such a liberty to do so. To the end we shall be satisfied in this point, and satisfie likewise our good friends and acquaintances in our natif country, to whose it is a terror, or fairful thing that men should be handeld so in Pennsylvania.

Signed

Garret Hendericks;                Derick up de Graeff; – 10th Great Uncle.

Francis daniell Pastorius;     Abraham up Den Graeft – 9th Great Grandfather.

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Recycling Clothes… 1

I Mean Really Recycling…

by donating, repurposing and actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

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However…

When the children outgrew their clothes, if they were still in good shape… I would clean and mend, then place them in bags marked with the gender, size and season.

Because…

Here in our area school district there were many children that did not even have underwear. (Sometimes it comes down to a choice… food or underwear?)

So I would also collect clothing from friends and neighbors. Jackets, hats, gloves, pants, tee shirts, socks and especially underpants. I would then process them, I would clean and mend, then place them in bags marked with the gender, size and season for the school nurse to give out as needed.

It was a labor of Love, I was Blessed with a Happy, Healthy Family, and wanted to share some of that warmth and love with the little ones of my community.  I believe in the ‘Ripple Effect’

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We all can help strengthen our Community, one baby step at a time.

What are some of your ideas?

Check out: Real Recycling… Back in the day.

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Rev. Gerard Beekman… 1558–1625 Ancestral Men of Faith

Translated The Original Bible Manuscripts into English, The King James Version

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Ancestral Men of Faith

Rev. Gerard Beekman 1558-1625                                                                                 11th Great Grandfather

He lived most of his life at Cologne on the Rhine. Died at Mülheim, Germany

The Beekmans were steadfast Protestants from the time that Martin Luther       in 1521 protested against the corruptions of the Church of Rome.

Gerardus Beekman received a University education and studied theology at Frankendale in the Palatinate Region, during the years 1576-78. He became one of the most learned scholars of his time. He is said to have been able to “speak, think and dream” in five languages.

He lived during the unsettling times succeeding the religious movement begun by Martin Luther, when a fanatical warfare was waged between the Roman Catholics and the followers of the reformed religion.

The persecution of Protestants by the Archbishop of Cologne was the cause of Gerardus’ settling in the neighboring city of Mülheim, a refuge for Protestants. Rev. Gerard Beekman took a prominent part in the support of the principles of the new church and was chosen one of the delegates to visit the Duke of New Berg, the Elector of Brandenburg and James I to secure their support in behalf of the reformed religion.

He was a distinguished theologian and one of the distinguished scholars who translated the Bible from the original manuscripts into English, The King James Version, for King James I.   -This is the Version we use.

He received special honors from the King for his services.

King James I. granted the family a remodeled and special Family Crest.

Beekman_coat_of_arms

“Distinguished Families in America, Descended from Willhelmus Beekman & Jan Thomasse VanDyke” by William B. Aitken. A.M., Ph.D. Illustrated by the author. New York & London, The Knickerbocker Press, G.P. Putnam’s Sons. published 1912, 316 pages

 

It is of interest to note here that,

the Beekmans have always been large landowners, and their preference has always been for a water view from their home estates, whether it was on the Rhine; on the Hudson or East Rivers of New York; or the Raritan or Millstone Rivers of New Jersey.

When the Princess of Portugal visited Holland in the seventeenth century the Dutch government received the permission of the Beekman family then residing at Nijmegen to hold the reception in her honor at their house.

 

The name Beekman is from “beck,” the Dutch for “mouth,” the English “beak,”          or it maybe an abbreviation of “bekken,” the Dutch word for basin.

According to Putnam’s Historic New York, “Beekman or the man of the brook;           this interpretation of the name was recognized by King James I. of England,           when he granted to the Rev. Mr. (Gerard) Beekman, grandfather of William,               as a coat of arms, a rivulet running between roses.” The crest is three feathers             on a helmet of steel represented in profile. The motto is: Mens conscia Recti.

This coat of arms was used by the grandson Wihelmus Beekman in his correspondence with Governor Stuyvesant.

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Chicken Pot Pie… Bot Boi

Old Mennonite cooking

Chicken was another frequent ingredient in old Mennonite cooking.

Chicken Pot Pie, Bot Boi

The Ingredients

  • 1 celery stalk w leaves,
  • 1 slice thin pepper
  • 3 lbs. chicken/parts
  • 4 potatoes, qtr.
  • 2 qt. water
  • 1 carrot, slice thin
  • 1 onion, dice
  • 2 T. parsley
  • 1 batch dough squares

The Process 

  • Cover chicken, stew almost tender. Strain. Bone chicken and dice.
  • Add potatoes, celery, carrots, onions, parsley and pepper. Bring to boil.
  • Add chicken. Drop half of squares into boiling broth, one by one, cover entire top. Stir, then add the rest. Cover tight.
  • Boil 20 min., until squares have a spongy texture when cut with a fork. Serve 6-8.

This is not what it will look like…

Mennonite / German Dutch Chicken Pot Pie is basically a stew,                             a thicken, beefed up (Oops), I means a bolstered up soup, not this… 🙂

Chicken pot pie #2

But, I also do this Chicken Pot Pie – quick and easy with Jiffy Baking Mix.

Quicky Chicken Pot Pie (or Cheater’s Pot Pie)

The Ingredients

  • 1+1/2 cup diced chicken           – usually leftover
  • 1 cup of veggies                         – I use mixed, corn, gr. beans, carrots, etc.
  • 1+1/2 – 2 cups of broth gravy  – some use canned gravy or cream soups,
  • 1 batch biscuit dough batter

The Process Chicken Pot Pie

  • Butter or spray pie plate.
  • Place chicken and (thawed) veggies in.
  • Cover with about 1/2 the gravy. Saving the extra gravy to pour on top, of finished servings. YUM
  • Pour biscuit dough batter over all the top
  • Bake on 400* F, until top is brown and gravy is bubbly. (abt. 35 min.)

HINTI make my own gravy from the roasting pan drippings.

  • Deglaze the pan and strain into a jar, refrigerate.
  • Next day scoop off the harden fat.
  • Use this broth thickened with corn starch, etc.
  • Season.

Chicken, a frequent ingredient in old Mennonite cooking.                                    Broths & Soups:          Chicken Corn Soups; Chicken Noodle Soups                          Main Dishes:               Chicken Baked in Cream; Chicken Fricassee;                                                             Chicken & Oyster Pie; Chicken & Pineapple.

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What are some of your families recipes?

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by. – OmaEagle

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Gerardus Wiltsee… 1735–1800 Revolutionary War Patriot

 

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War Patriot

Gerardus Wiltsse   1735–1800
5th Great Grandfather, DAR Ancestor

Private – Albany Co., New York Militia

under Col. Cornelius Van Veghten, 13th regt.

He was born in Newtown, Queens, New York.

He died in Wilsey Hill, Herkimer, New York

The Wiltzee line arrived in the New World in 1623.                                             They were one of the families with first original Dutch Migration settling The Dutch Colony of New Amsterdam, as part of the Dutch West Indies Company. They were financiers and fur traders.
Gerardus’ 2nd Great Grandfather Philippe, was massacred by indians in 1632 at Fort Zwaanendael in Delaware. (Philippe was our 9th Great Grandfather)
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All his lines were from the Netherlands and were here by the mid 1600’s.
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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

 

Apples in Old Mennonite Cooking

Apples were a frequent ingredient in old Mennonite cooking.

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Apples, Apples, Apples Everywhere,                                                                      Eat them whole, or cook them pared.

We have Apple Strudel, Apple Pandowdy, Friar’s Apple Charlotte, some call it Betty, some call it Crisp, etc. They are all basically the same, and very easy to make. They all start off with apples sliced into casserole dish. Then are either topped with a crumble top (flour &/or oats), a breadcrumb top, or a biscuit dough top.

I Decided to Play

Well I decided to use a cake batter, not to have an apple cake, but apples with some cake crumbles. I filled the dishes 3/4 full with chunked apples. Poured plain prepared cake mix over the apples. Stirred it through. Sprinkled the top with cinnamon and pumpkin pie spice. Cooked about 40 minutes, at 350* until the apples were done to my liking.

It made a great breakfast, and snack, mostly baked flavored apples. 😀

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Apples, Apples, Apples Everywhere,                                                                    And used in everything.

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Salads

  • Apple Walnut Salad
  • Beet & Apple Salad

Sweet & Sours

  • Apple Sauce
  • Apple Butter
  • Apple & Peach Conserve
  • Spiced Apples

Vegetable Dishes

  • Scalloped Sweet Potato & Apple

Breakfast

Desserts

  • Apple sauce Cake
  • Apple Dumplings            – whole apple with biscuit dough
  • Apple Strudel                  – sliced into casserole, crumble top
  • Apple Pandowdy            – sliced into casserole, biscuit dough top
  • Friar’s Apple Charlotte  – sliced into casserole, breadcrumb top
  • Schnitz Pie (dried apples)
  • Apple Butter Pie
  • Apple Crumble Pie           Apple Crumble Pie

Main Dishes

  • Schnitz Un Knepp – Ham with dried apples
  • Rote Kraut
  • Sauerkraut

Beverages

  • Apple Cider

and last but not least Scrapple – No, just kidding 😀

 

What are some of your families recipes?

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by. – OmaEagle

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Nicholas Slough… 1757–1834 Revolutionary War Patriot

I LOVE Genealogy… 

Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War Patriot 

Nicholas SLOUGH 1757–1834
5th Great Grandfather, DAR & SAR Patriot Ancestor

Service: Pennsylvania Rank: Private
1) Col Wm. Dean, Capt Jacob Peterman, Phila Co.
2) Associators & Militiamen

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Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle