William Henry Dennell… 1841 – 1921 73rd Regiment of Penna. Volunteers

Civil War Veteran

William H Dennell, 1st Lt.                                                                          

2nd Great Grandfather

  • Born and lived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Lived in Hancock, Washington Co, Md.
  • Lived in New Castle Co., DE.
  • Died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Occupations:

  • Sailor
  • Civil War Soldier signed up for 6 years.
  • United States Marine Corp. (Sailor)
  • Railroad Engineer (Trolley)
  • Machinist at Mill

Seventy-Third Regiment originally known as the Pennsylvania Legion, 45th of the line, was recruited in the city of Philadelphia, during the months of June and July, 1861

  • Mustered in: 8 Aug 1861 for 3 yrs.
  • Reenlisted as Veteran Volunteer: 1 Jan 1864 for 3 more yrs.
  • Promoted – 1st Sergeant to 1st Lieutenant 26 May 1865
  • Mustered out with Co., 14 July 1865 – Vet. at Alexandria,Virginia

Enlisted in U.S. Marine Corp. 5 July 1866 (Sailor)

73rd Regiment of Penna. Volunteers                                                                       73rd Regiment of Penna. Veterans Volunteers Battles

  • 28-30 August 1862 – Second Bull Run (Manassas). Prince William Co, VA.
  • 30 April – 6 May 1863 – Battle of Chancellorsville. Spotsylvania Co, VA.
  • 1-3 July 1863 – Battle of Gettysburg, Gettysburg, PA.
  • 25 November 1863 – Battle of Missionary Ridge. Chattanooga, TN. 

 

GAR grave marker

 

VETERAN VOLUNTEER ENLISTMENT

State of Tennessee Town of Lookout Valley

I, William Dennell born in Philadelphia in the State of Pennsylvania aged 23 years, and by occupation a Sailor Do HEREBY ACKNOWLEDGE to have voluntary re-enlisted, this First day of January 1864, to serve a VETERAN VOLUNTEER, in the Army of the United States of America, for the period of THREE YEARS, unless sooner discharged by proper authority: Do also agree to accept such bounty, pay rations, and clothing, as are, or may be, established by law for volunteers. And I, William Dennell do solemnly swear, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies or opposers whomsoever; and that I will observe and obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to the Rules and Articles of War.

Sworn and subscribed to, at Lookout Valley Tenn } William Dennell  this First day of January 1864. BEFORE 1st Lieut. Henry Hess 73rd P. V.

I CERTIFY ON HONOR, That I have carefully examined the above-named Veteran Volunteer, agreeably to the General Regulations of the Army, and that in my opinion he is free from all bodily defects and mental infirmity, which would, in any way disqualify him from performing the duties of a soldier. J. S. Treyles (?) Examining Surgeon.

I CERTIFY, ON HONOR, That I have minutely inspected the Veteran Volunteer, previous to his enlistment, and that he was entirely sober when enlisted; that, to the best of my judgement and belief, he is of lawful age; and that, in accepting him as duly qualified to perform the duties of an able- bodied soldier, I have strictly observed the Regulations which govern the recruiting service.

This soldier has Gray eyes, Brown hair, Dark complexion, is 5 feet 11½ inch high

Seventy-third Regiment of Penna Volunteers, 1stLt. Henry Hess 73′ Reg P.V., Recruiting Officer. Mustered into Comp E Seventy Third Regt Penns Veteran Volt Regiment this first day of January 1864 Robt E Beicher

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parents, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,     and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

 

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Wilhelmus Beekman… 1623-1707

 

Wilhelmus_Beekman_c1645

Wilhelmus Hendrickse Beekman 1623–1707
9th GG Father

was a Dutch immigrant to America who came to New Amsterdam (now New York City) from the Netherlands in the same vessel (the ship Princess, on May 27, 1647) with Director-General, afterwards, Governor Peter Stuyvesant.

He had a long life in public service:

  • Treasurer of the Dutch West India Company
  • Mayor of New York City
  • Governor of area now, Delaware, 1653-1664
  • Governor of area now, Penna, 1658-1663

The Beekmans were steadfast Protestants from the time that Martin Luther       in 1521 protested against the corruptions of the Church of Rome.

His Grandfather was Rev. Gerard Beekman 1558–1625, our 11th GG Father. Gerard was one of our ‘Ancestral Men of Faith’, he translated The Original Bible Manuscripts into English, The King James Version. For his services, King James I. granted the family a remodeled and special Family Crest.
Rev. Gerard Beekman… 1558–1625 Ancestral Men of Faith 

Distinguished Families in America, Decending from Willhelmus Beekman and Jan Thomasse VanDyke” by William B. Aitken, A.M., Ph.D.  Illustrated by the author. New York and London, The Knickerbocker Press, G.P. Putnam’s Sons. published 1912, 316 pages.

The name Beekman is from ‘beck,’ the Dutch word for ‘mouth,’ the English ‘beak,’ or it maybe an abbreviation of ‘bekken,’ the Dutch word for basin.

Beekman_coat_of_arms

According to Putnam’s Historic New York, “Beekman or the man of the brook; this interpretation of the name was recognized by King James I. of England, when he granted to the Rev. Mr. (Gerard) Beekman, grandfather of William, as a coat of arms, a rivulet running between roses.” The crest is three feathers on a helmet of steel represented in profile. The motto is: Mens conscia Recti.

This coat of arms was used by the grandson Wihelmus Beekman in his correspondence with Governor Stuyvesant.

 

Wilhelmus Beekman’s wife:

Catalina Catharine De BOUGH 1623–1701

9th GG Mother

* BEEKMAN, Catalina Catherine (De BOUGH)

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parents, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

.

 

Quilt Stash – Recycling Clothes 4

Quilts

 

I Mean Really Recycling… 

by donating, repurposing or actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

 

Preparing to Repurpose…

 

For the Quilts:

  • I cut heavy-duty plastic into 12 x 12, 8 x 8, and 6 x 6 square templates.
  • I cut the materials into desired sizes.
  • I separate them by size, materials, and colors into individual ziplock bags.
  • Save special items in their own bags: pockets, logos, zippers, buttons, etc.
  • I store the bags in see-through container.
  • Once I am ready to start a project, I can see all I have on hand at a glance.

 

 

 

My Quilt for Daughter

My quilt for BLD

 

Read the story about our Family Quilts here: Recycling Clothes… 2

 

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Friedrich Wilhelm Bernhardt 1845–1892

GAR grave marker

Civil War Veteran                                                         PA. 6th Calvary ‘Rush’s Lancers’

Friedrich Wilhelm Bernhardt                                    2nd Great Grandfather                                           Born 1845 • Württemberg, Hamburg, Germany         Died 1892  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania                     He was a Boot/ Shoemaker                   


The Sixth Pennsylvania Calvary “Rush’s Lancers”

Rush's Lancers

The men of the Sixth Pennsylvania were the cream of Philadelphia society. Most of the officers came from the leading families of the City of Brotherly Love. Many of them served in the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, a militia unit that was originally formed to serve as George Washington’s personal body guard during the Revolutionary War. These bright, talented young men left their mark on many battlefield of the Civil War, earning them the proud title of…           “the Seventh Regulars.”

Frederick Bernhardt, Pvt. – 70th Regiment Sixth Pa. Vol. Cavalry             Company F -recruited in Philadelphia.

A Pvt. Civil War Union Soldier for 1 year term                                               Mustered in 10 Mar 1865, with Company F of the 6th Penna. Volunteers Cavalry, known as “Rush’s Lancers”. Was transferred to Company D, 2nd Provisional Cavalry, June 17, 1865. He mustered out Lebanon, Kentucky, August 7, 1865.

The Sixth Pennsylvania Cavalry                                                                        participated in these engagements during his career

  • 28 March-9 April 1865 – Appomattox Campaign, VA
  • 30 March 1865 – Skirmishes on the line of Hatcher’s and Gravelly Runs, VA
  • 30-31 March 1865 – Engagement, Dinwiddie Court House, VA
  • 1 April 1865 – Battle, Five Forks, VA
  • 2 April 1865 – Action, Scott’s Cross Roads, VA
  • 4 April 1865 – Skirmish, Tabernacle Church (Beaver Dam Creek), VA
  • 6 April 1865 – Engagement, Sailor’s Creek, VA
  • 8 April 1865 – Engagement, Appomattox Station, VA
  • 9 April 1865 – Engagement, Clover Hill, Appomattox Court House, VA
  • 9 April 1865 – The Surrender, Appomattox Court House, VA

The Battle of Appomattox Court House, fought on the morning of April 9, 1865, was one of the last battles of the Civil War. The final engagement of General Robert E. Lee and his Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. That afternoon under Robert E. Lee the Confederate Army surrendered to the Union Army under Lt. General Ulysses S. Grant.

 

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parents, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Rag Rugs – Recycling Clothes 3

Rag Rugs

 

I Mean Really Recycling… 

by donating, repurposing or actually composting them…

When we, the adults, outgrew our clothes and textiles, I would donate some of the good usable items to charities that actually help clothe and house people, such as Sal-Val (Salvation Army) or the Breakfast Mission.

Others I would repurpose by making new items for the home.

  • Big items: Patchwork bedspreads, blankets, rag rugs, etc.
  • Small items: Kid clothes, vests, scarves, hats, bags, throws, bath mats, pillows, pillowcases, seat cushions, clothespin bags, washcloths, etc.
  • If an item seemed too worn, I would tear it into cleaning and polishing cloths or gardening covers and ties.
  • I have occasionally composted them.

 

Preparing to Repurpose…

 

For the Rag Rugs:

  • I cut the material into 1 to 1.5 inch strips. (depending on it’s thickness)
  • I begin to wind it into a ball, like yarn
  • I knot the ends together as I go. (I have occasionally sewn the ends.)
  • Store in see-through bin.

 

Rag Rugs in the works…

 

Finished Chair Cushions

mint seat cushionseat cushionf

 

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Jacob Clair Rapp… 1836 – 1932

Civil War Veteran

Jacob Clair RAPP 1836-1932,   2nd great grandfather

Note: In 1932, within a 10 week period, Three of my Rapp ‘Grandfathers’ died

  • Sunday 28 Aug 1932, Edward 27, my Grandfather, Jacob’s grandson, died.
  • Saturday 22 Oct 1932, Jacob 96, my 2nd Great Grandfather died.
  • Friday 4 Nov 1932, Harry 67, my Great Grandfather, Jacob’s son, died.

GAR grave marker

The Daily Republican, Phoenixville, Pa.

Obituary on 22 October 1932

TAPS SOUNDED TODAY FOR 96-YEAR-OLD VET

Well-Known Phoenixville Indian and Civil War Soldier, Passed Away

Death marched early today with the Grand Army of the Republic and snatched another member of “the Boys in Blue”.

Jacob Rapp, 96-year-old veteran of the conflict between the North and the South and a survivor of several conflicts between the Indians and frontiersmen in pioneer days, was called at one o’clock this morning. He was conscious up to the very end, and showed the same bravery he often exhibited on the field of battle.

Although Mr. Rapp suffered a great physical handicap because of defective hearing for the past several years, he was apparently in good health until about three weeks ago. His death was the result of heart trouble and a kidney condition. His son, H. C. Rapp, the only survivor of the prominent Chester County family, said today that during the past week his father was well aware of his serious condition and expressed the desire that “he might die before winter set in.” “Father always dreaded cold weather and that is why I think he made those statements.” said his son.

At 12:30 o’clock this morning the son went to his father’s bedside. Several minutes later Dr. George W. Sharshon was called by telephone and told of Mr. Rapp’s failing condition. Shortly before the physician arrived the veteran passed away in his son’s arms. According to his son his father never lost consciousness.

The funeral will be held at the late home of the Civil War veteran, on Valley Forge Road near the East Borough Line, on Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock, with simple rites. Dr. R. S. Walker, pastor of the First Baptist Church, will be in charge. It is understood members of the G.A.R. Post and other military organizations will attend. Interment will be made in Morris Cemetery.

Mr. Rapp would have been 97 years of age on July 24, 1933, had he lived until that time. He was the son of Amos and Catherine Rapp, and was born July 24, 1836, at Rapp’s Corner. During his entire life he resided in Chester County in this vicinity.

Fought Indians in Iowa

At the age of twenty-one years. Mr. Rapp enlisted in the United States Regular Army and was sent to Northern Iowa where there was an uprising among the Indians. Although he escaped wounds, Mr. Rapp took part in several spirited engagements and in later years took great interest in telling of the time when he escaped being captured by the Indians “after a long chase.”

When the Civil War broke out he re-enlisted in the army. He joined the Union forces on 15 August 1862 at Harrisburg, as a member of Company I, 125th Regiment. Capt. Benjamin F. Bean was in charge of the company and Frederick Shunk was the vice-captain. Mr. Rapp was a sergeant in the company. In May of 1863 he was mustered out of service at Harrisburg.

Was In Major Battles

During his enlistment in the army he took part in the following encounters: skirmish at Kearneyville, 16 October 1862; battle of Fredericksburg, 13 December 1862; and the five-day battle of Chancellorsville, commencing on 1 May 1863.

After the war he married Marietta Stauffer, who passed away at the age of 88 years, just two years ago. Two children were born to the union, Harry C. Rapp, who resides at the Rapp home in Schuylkill township, and Carrie Anderson, who passed away at the age of 12 years.

A Carpenter by Trade

After the Civil War Mr. Rapp became a carpenter and worked with Jesse Jarrett, one of the leading contractors in Montgomery County. Until his retirement at the age of 82, Mr. Rapp worked day in and day out at his trade. Many of the older homes in Phoenixville are a product of Mr. Rapp’s workmanship.

No brothers or sisters survive the deceased man. There were eight sons and daughters in the family and with the passing of Jacob Rapp the family of Amos and Catherine Rapp has become extinct.

Mr. Rapp was an active member of the Josiah White Post, G.A.R, and served as its commander at one time. He was always interested in political affairs in Phoenixville and Schuylkill township, although he never aspired to office.

.

Obituary – Thursday October 27, 1932 Phoenixville

FULL MILITARY RITES MARKED RAPP’S BURIAL

96-Year-Old Phoenixville Veteran Accorded Honors Yesterday;

Interment in Morris Cemetery

Impressive military services marked the burial of Jacob Rapp, 96-year-old veteran of Indian battles and the Civil War, yesterday afternoon, with Dr. R. S. Walker, pastor of the First Baptist Church, officiating.

The services were conducted at his late residence on Valley Forge Road near Corner Stores. Four of his Comrades, Samuel Green, Edward McDonough, Albert Butts and Isiah March, attended the services. Three other surviving members of the G.A.R. Did not attend because of illness.

Simple rites were conducted by Dr. Walker at the late residence. Two members of the Samuel A. Whitaker Post, American Legion, acted as honor guards. Relatives of the veteran were pallbearers as follows: Jacob Rapp, Harry C. Rapp, jr., George Smith, Wm. Thomas, Samuel Cox and Christ Schmidt.

The color bearers were Jesse Neuman and Forrest Trick, with John W. Shaffer as the bugler. The firing squad of the American Legion, comprised of Leroy Reber, commander; Fred Troxell, Russell Patterson, Elmer E. Schaeffer, Ralph Snyder, William Hopple, Grant L. Rapp and Arthur Wood, fired several volleys over the grave.

At Morris Cemetery where interment was made, members of the Legion conducted the G.A.R. Ritual services. Three volleys were fired and taps were sounded.

.

Reach out and touch your Elders,

talk to them and take many notes, even if what they say doesn’t make sense to you. Where did they, their parent, grandparents live, work, etc. Ask about customs, foods, trades, don’t forget to include the hearsay (it might come in handy). Write everything they say down, it may come into play later.

Have Fun -OmaEagle

 

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle

Summertime Treats…

Eggplant, Tomatoes, and Sweet Corn

Yummy Fresh Eats… Loving July into August.

We live in PA.

However…                                                                                                                 We make a run over to Jersey once a week to buy Old Mr. King’s Sweet Treats.  I don’t know whether it is the Jersey sandy soil, or that his farm is in the middle of the Wharton State Forest. Maybe it is the Love he puts into his craft. Perhaps all three combined that make his Eggplant (he says it’s male), Tomatoes, Corn and, last but not least, the Zucchini the Sweetest ever. He has been working this farm since he was a kid. He always says: “I’m happy to still be working this side of the grass.” 😀

For us the near 2 hour, 66 mile round trip a week worth it. 🙂

Eggplant

I cannot get enough of his fresh Sweet Jersey Eggplant.                                        I eat it hot, fresh off the griddle, topped with Sweet Red Jersey Tomatoes.         Then later that night, I eat it cold right from the Ice Box. (ahem… Fridge)

Finally for the ‘Desert’, Sweet, Sweet Jersey Corn.

Eggplant, Corn on Cob, Tomato

The best way to fix eggplant for Our Family is:

  • Peel then slice just under 1/2 inch thick.
  • Salt, and set aside for near an hour.
  • Rinse and blot off excess water.
  • Have skillet / griddle medium hot.
  • Press slices into  flour on both sides.
  • then dip into a beaten egg, thinned with a drizzle of water or milk.
  • Press into bread crumbs on both sides. (your choice of seasoning)
  • Then fry, until golden brown on each side.

My Happy Summer Song – DD

Summertime and the Livin’ is Easy,                                                             Summertime and the Livin’ is Right,                                                                       Summertime and the Livin’ is Breezy,                                                                 Oh.. Oh.. Oh.. Summ… Sum, Summertime.

Summertime is sweet, sweet Eatin’,                                                       Summertime and the Veggies are Ripe,                                                               Summertime nights are long and Bright,                                                                 Oh.. Oh.. Oh.. Summ… Sum, Summertime.

 

What are some of your families recipes?

Take Care, Thanks for stopping by.

I hope you join me on my journey, as I recount many things from my past,       and explore the many other creative possibilities in my future. – OmaEagle